Our Community's Health Matters. Let's Fight For It.

San Francisco’s proposed soda tax will reduce soda consumption and fund active recreation and nutrition programs in SF public schools, Recreation and Park Department rec centers and sports programs, and food access and nutrition education through the Department of Public Health.

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    Support the Soda Tax and Stop Big Soda

    The Soda Tax proposed in San Francisco's Measure E and Berkeley's Measure D, on the ballot this November, is one of chronic disease prevention's all time “best buys”. It can help reduce consumption of the largest single contributor of empty calories and added sugar — soda and other sugary drinks. It can do it for everyone, every day, and everywhere in those communities. It doesn’t cost government money; instead it raises funds that can support critically important public health programs, including those to prevent or address the problems caused by these products. That is, our massive epidemic of obesity and diabetes, not to mention heart disease and tooth decay. It puts the burden on the right people: the ones who are making extraordinary profits pushing this stuff on our families.

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    Yes on E, Soda Tax Funds Will Provide Support for Children's Health and Nutrition

    Despite her best effort, she just couldn’t concentrate on the task at hand.

    I tried moving her desk closer to the board. I tried afterschool tutoring and early morning practice with the coming assignment. I even tried presenting the lesson by putting the words to music. Nothing was working, and Reyna* was falling farther and farther behind in her studies.

    It was critically important that Reyna*, a fifth grader at Willie Brown College Preparatory Academy in Bayview-Hunters Point, master the academic skills necessary to ensure she and her fellow students were ready for middle school and beyond. As their teacher in 2008, it was my privilege and honor to do my part to make this their reality.

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    Healthy Corner Stores Decolonize Our Diets

    The corporate control over our food system has colonized our diets. Highly processed foods have become a part of our regular diet, disconnected us from the earth, become cheaper and more readily available than quality foods, and have made us oblivious to the detrimental impacts of their consumption. Food justice is the notion that access to fresh, nutritious, and affordable food is a fundamental human right. Quality food products should not only be available to those who have the resources to spend $10 on an organic tomato, especially when eating more nutritious foods is one of the greatest preventative health measures one can take. The work of the Tenderloin Healthy Corner Store Coalition (www.HealthyTL.org) is to empower residents by increasing their access to quality and affordable foods through converting corner stores into healthy retailers.

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    Food Bank Says No to Donated Soda, Votes Yes on Beverage Tax

    SF-Marin Food BankIn 2014, the SF-Marin Food Bank officially drove out the last can of soda from our inventory. For the past decade, we have steadily reduced the amount of soda we receive.

    Readers may wonder how soda ever found its way into the Food Bank inventory. Rest assured, food drive participants weren’t placing two-liters in the collection bins. Soda comes to food banks by way of mixed truckloads donated by food manufacturers and other food banks. For instance, two pallets of soda might be stacked in the back of an 18-wheeler of donated cereal.

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    The Power of Organizing

    Every now and then, pundit and pollster Election Day predictions are way off. The talking heads chat back and forth, speculating about what went wrong. But guess who almost always knows the answer? Organizers. And the underlying cause of those inaccurate predictions? Usually, organizers. Good organizers inspire and engage. These mysterious people who showed up to vote didn’t make it into pollsters’ voting models.

    For San Francisco’s soda tax, our organizers are engaging voters and recruiting volunteers every single day in every neighborhood. Building an army of volunteers is how we are going to beat Big Soda this November, and is the reason we started organizing a year before this November’s election. Will you join us by supporting their hard work?

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    Latest Headline: Is San Francisco Big Soda's Waterloo?

    “This is the first real attempt anywhere in the country where those leading the effort for a tax can match the capacity of the beverage industry." – SF Magazine July 2014.

    Check out the July issue of San Francisco Magazine. Their article on our campaign to pass a soda tax is right — San Francisco isn’t any other American City, and this isn’t 2012. 

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    Why I'm Supporting the San Francisco Soda Tax

    Generally, a healthy lifestyle is equated with a well-balanced diet of healthy foods and exercise. They’re both an important part of living well and can increase life expectancy. However, knowing what to avoid is also an important component of leading a healthy life. Consumption of soda and other sugary beverages are not part of a healthy lifestyle and are affecting our children.

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    Grocery Store Workers, UFCW Local 648 Endorse San Francisco Soda Tax

    We are proud to announce that we earned the endorsement of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 648—which represents grocery store workers across the City—signing on in support last week.

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    Soda’s Impact on Schools

    In the conversation about a tax on sugary beverages in San Francisco, most of the attention has focused on the detrimental health impacts of soda, and whether or not a tax on sugary beverages will lead to less use.

    These are important questions, with big implications, and ones that the scientists, doctors, and researchers are perfectly qualified to handle. Take the politics out of it, and much like global warming, the science and the facts fall clearly on one side in this debate. Soda is a unique driving factor in causing obesity, which is the greatest public health crisis facing our country, particularly among children.

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    You think a soda tax is regressive? Try diabetes.

    Two years ago my father was warned that he was at high risk for Type 2 Diabetes and heart disease. On the surface, he doesn’t seem unhealthy. He actually has a pretty balanced diet, he stays active in retirement, he rarely drinks alcohol, and he doesn’t smoke. But it’s no mystery as to what had been causing my father’s health issues, including a long history of stomach ulcers and high blood pressure. For as long as I can remember, my father has always had a soda with every meal, including breakfast. My father now admits that because he had been drinking soda for so long, it was pretty clear that he had an addiction to it. He’s cut out soda almost completely and his health has drastically improved.

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