Our Community's Health Matters. Let's Fight For It.

San Francisco’s proposed soda tax will reduce soda consumption and fund active recreation and nutrition programs in SF public schools, Recreation and Park Department rec centers and sports programs, and food access and nutrition education through the Department of Public Health.

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  • Featured post

    Draining the Myth that a Soda Tax Threatens Affordability

    As a supporter of San Francisco’s Proposition E, the proposed tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on November’s ballot, I’ve been asked to explain why it is the right choice for our city. In recent months, San Franciscans have received a barrage of information about Prop E from the $300 billion soda industry, and it’s important to understand facts.

    Playing on the fears of San Franciscans concerned about our city’s affordability crisis, the Big Soda industry claims that the sugary-beverage tax will dramatically raise grocery costs for San Francisco families. They are calling it a regressive tax that unfairly punishes the most needy in our city.

    I just don’t buy this argument, just as I don’t buy soda for my household.

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  • Featured post

    It’s a Value Statement

    It’s pretty easy to see what a person’s priorities are by observing their actions. You may hear them say one thing, but if they do another, well, you know the drill.

    “[Fill in child’s name here], will you please go clean your room?” “Yes, mom.”
    The football game watching/video game playing/teasing his sister continues.
    Waiting. Nothing is happening.
    “Did you hear me?”
    "What?"
    "Your room."
    "Oh, yeah. Just ten more minutes. I promise."
    Two hours later the room still looks the same.

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  • Featured post

    Big Soda Reeks of Big Tobacco

    I have watched relatives — long-time smokers — die of cancer. I have seen the parents of my young students struggling with Type II diabetes, unable to provide the support they wanted as they battled the disease.

    The tobacco wars of the last half of the 20th century began before I was born, but I can’t help noticing the similarities with the debate over soda and Proposition E. I’m glad to be able to speak up this time, and have a voice in this battle.

    Tobacco companies denied the link between nicotine and lung cancer, yet they knew full well what they were doing. Like Big Tobacco, Big Soda denies their product’s impact, in this case the direct link between sugary drinks and Type II diabetes (and the strong correlational link to obesity); they, too, know full well what they are doing.

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  • Featured post

    Soda, the Sugar-Coated Toxin

    Coke & Jolly Ranchers.jpgWhich of these meals is better for your health?

    Neither looks terribly healthy, but which do you think would be better for you: 1) the burger and coke, 2) or the burger with the 16 pieces of candy?

    As it turns out, that 20 oz. coke contains 65 grams of sugar, the same amount that is in those 16 candies (the equivalent of 16 teaspoons of sugar; e.g., A LOT of sugar). But did you know that the coke may actually be worse for you than those hard candies?

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    Parents Welcome Support to Raise Healthy Kids in San Francisco

    I’ve been a public health professional for over 20 years, but the most important job I’ve ever had is being a mom to my 12-year-old daughter.

    Raising a child in San Francisco has its challenges, and I, like many parents, rely on a network of supports to make it through our days. Regardless of our educational backgrounds, our financial resources, our culture or language, San Francisco parents and guardians rely on family, friends, caretakers, teachers, daycare providers, after-school staff, crossing guards, neighbors, and yes, our City government to ensure that our kids are safe, healthy, and happy.

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  • Featured post

    Vote Yes on E to Save Lives in San Francisco

    When people in our community are empowered to eat better and lead healthier lives, everyone benefits. That’s why Project Open Hand supports Proposition E, the tax on sugared beverages. Proposition E provides a real opportunity to improve the health and well-being of San Francisco residents.

    At Project Open Hand, we see the effects of poor nutrition on a daily basis. Some of our most critically ill clients come to us after years of eating poorly, often because healthy choices were not available to them. For many clients with diabetes, heart disease, HIV and other serious illnesses, their diseases were caused or exacerbated by poor nutrition.

    As of 2010, nearly a third (31.7%) of children and adolescents in San Francisco were either obese or overweight. And we know that overweight children all-too-often grow up to be unhealthy, overweight adults. Furthermore, one in three children born today will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Proposition E supports programs that can get young people back on track to living active, healthy lives.

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  • Latest from the blog

    Draining the Myth that a Soda Tax Threatens Affordability

    As a supporter of San Francisco’s Proposition E, the proposed tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on November’s ballot, I’ve been asked to explain why it is the right choice for our city. In recent months, San Franciscans have received a barrage of information about Prop E from the $300 billion soda industry, and it’s important to understand facts.

    Playing on the fears of San Franciscans concerned about our city’s affordability crisis, the Big Soda industry claims that the sugary-beverage tax will dramatically raise grocery costs for San Francisco families. They are calling it a regressive tax that unfairly punishes the most needy in our city.

    I just don’t buy this argument, just as I don’t buy soda for my household.

    Continue reading → See all posts
  • Featured post

    A Yes Vote on Measure E, the San Francisco Soda Tax, Will Help Make ‘PE for All’ a Reality

    When the Giants won the World Series in 2010 and 2012, my elementary school-age daughter and I were beyond excited. But my elation was dampened by the reality that many children never learn how to swing a bat or throw a ball during the school day, because the funding simply hasn’t been there for quality Physical Education in our public schools.

    That will change when voters pass the San Francisco Soda Tax, which will generate revenue mandated to support PE in public schools. The tax will make it possible for ALL public school students to get regular PE, which benefits children’s bodies and minds.

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  • Featured post

    Big Soda Wants to Be Your Buddy

    Coca-Cola-Buddy.jpgBut honestly, what kind of friend concocts a sugary substance that science has shown to cause diabetes, heart attacks and cancer; and then relentlessly markets this liquid candy to our teens and children, especially our kids of color?

    Big Soda, represented by the American Beverage Association (which in SF calls itself the Coalition for an Affordable City), wants us to believe it is selling the promise of happiness, when in reality it is selling children the promise of amputations, blindness, and kidney failure.

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  • Featured post

    Support the Soda Tax and Stop Big Soda

    The Soda Tax proposed in San Francisco's Measure E and Berkeley's Measure D, on the ballot this November, is one of chronic disease prevention's all time “best buys”. It can help reduce consumption of the largest single contributor of empty calories and added sugar — soda and other sugary drinks. It can do it for everyone, every day, and everywhere in those communities. It doesn’t cost government money; instead it raises funds that can support critically important public health programs, including those to prevent or address the problems caused by these products. That is, our massive epidemic of obesity and diabetes, not to mention heart disease and tooth decay. It puts the burden on the right people: the ones who are making extraordinary profits pushing this stuff on our families.

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